Baby, It's Cold Outside, Get Your Immunity in Gear

The 1944 classic winter song, “Baby It's Cold Outside,” has stirred plenty of controversies lately.

The thing is, whether you choose to stay in where it's warm or venture out, you need your immune system in crack shape during the winter months.

But are you really more likely to get a cold in winter? Doctors usually say this is a myth. You don't come down with a cold because you got cold.  Except that in a roundabout way, you do.

The viruses that cause colds multiply faster at somewhat lower temperatures. In winter, as you inhale colder air outdoors, it temporarily reduces the temperature in your nose, which encourages the viruses to multiply more rapidly and infect you more easily.

Another study that confirms we're prone to more colds in winter comes from a different angle. It turns out that your genes change seasonally. In winter, our DNA dials up the activity in our genes that control inflammation. Thus we are more likely to respond to germs around us with swelling, mucus, achiness, low-grade fever, and other signs of inflammation at work to fight off cold germs.

This is an interesting reaction that seems to apply no matter where you live... with some local variations. That's what makes it even more likely that our bodies prepare to get more colds when it's cold outside. The scientists collected data on about 1,000 people distributed across six countries: the US, the UK, Australia, Germany, Iceland, and the Gambia, in West Africa. 

People's immune systems and inflammatory processes revved up during the winter in the countries that had cold winters. But the Gambia is hot all year. In the Gambia, DNA dialed up the inflammatory readiness in the summer rainy season when mosquitoes abound. 

You can increase your immunity by simply not doing the things that lower it. Get enough sleep, eat well, exercise moderately.

The other good thing you can do for yourself is to try Isoprex this winter. Inflammation to fight germs is a good thing—until the system goes into overdrive and fails to turn off. Then it causes havoc throughout the body. One way that shows up in middle age and later is in the pain of arthritis. It can also mean a stuffier nose and more fever than your body really needs to fight a cold.

Isoprex supports the body to keep the right balance—allowing your genes to do what they should, then helping them remember to shut off.

Your cold could thank you. If you even get one.


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